Activate Your Premium Membership Today >

EICMA 2022: Honda Debuts the XL750 Transalp

Design Inspo Was ‘Friendly Toughness’; Think They Hit the Mark?

Honda's new XL750 Transalpine. Media sourced via our own channels; all rights reserved.
Honda's new XL750 Transalpine. Media sourced via our own channels; all rights reserved.

Honda’s finally revealed their middleweight adventure bike – and the resurrection of the OG Transalp legacy continues!

The debut dropped at this year’s iteration of EICMA, where the Japanese multi-conglomerate firm showed off more than one color scheme to the eager public.

Take a look at this video taken at EICMA by a friend of the team:

Based on what we know, the Honda XL750 carries a steel diamond frame and the same heart as the new CB750 Hornet; a 755cc, parallel-twin engine (with a 270° crank) revving through 90.5hp @ 9500rpm and 55.2ft-lbs of torque @ 7250rpm, with an advertised “substantial top end punch, with mountains of torque in the low to mid rpm range” (via Honda’s press release)

That’s a lot of cheddar, considering the original Transalp hefted 386lb/50hp.

Honda's new XL750 Transalp. Media sourced via Honda.
Honda’s new XL750 Transalp. Media sourced via Honda.

The XL750 pulls inspiration from other Honda models; her Unicam head working “35.5mm diameter inlet valves – with 9.3mm lift – via cam, and 29mm diameter exhaust – with 8.2mm lift – by rocker arm” is the same as the MX competition ready CRF450R. With the improved throttle response also comes Honda’s integration of Nickel-Silicon Carbide – Ni-SiC – coating in her cylinders (the very same as is currently sitting in the CRF450R and CBR1000RR-R Fireblade). 

Due to the clever decision of allowing the primary drive gear to spin the balance shaft, balancer drive gear isn’t needed; instead, more room is made while the concealed water pump on the left engine cover keeps everything neat and tidy. 

Honda's new XL750 Transalpine. Media sourced via our own channels; all rights reserved.
Honda’s new XL750 Transalpine. Media sourced via our own channels; all rights reserved.

Of course, what would an ADV bike be without the cushy stuff? Showa 43mm SFF-CATM USD forks to the honors here, with the rear shock operating through Pro-Link.

For electronics, we’ve got everything running through Honda’s Throttle By Wire, getting the rider 5 riding modes with various combinations of “Engine Power, Engine Braking and Honda Selectable Torque Control (HSTC) with integrated Wheelie Control.”

Honda's new XL750 Transalp. Media sourced via Honda.
Honda’s new XL750 Transalp. Media sourced via Honda.

Beyond that, Honda’s decked this model out with an HISS security system, an optional quickshifter, and a 5-inch TFT colour display capable of a Honda Smartphone Voice Control system, with LED lighting showing off Emergency Stop Signal technology and auto-cancel as a convenient add-on. 

Expect the Honda XL750 Transalp to be available in Matt Iridium Gray Metallic, Matt Ballistic Black Metallic and a more modern homage to the original, classic Ross White Tricolour.

Honda's new XL750 Transalpine. Media sourced via our own channels; all rights reserved.
Honda’s new XL750 Transalpine. Media sourced via our own channels; all rights reserved.

Pricing is TBA, with an EU debut ahead of a potential (fingers crossed) arrival in the US; our teammate Jim Pruner has had a good gander at the specs for both this beastie and Suzuki’s all-new, very competitive V-Strom 800DE, with the following anecdotes for the evening’s shenanigans:

  • Honda has built a 2019 KTM 790 Adventure S with a higher center of gravity that is possibly a bit more reliable/less expensive to maintain.
  • Suzuki has built a 2019 BMW F850GS that is less expensive, possibly a bit more reliable, and comes with luggage.

What do you think?

Stay tuned, drop a comment below letting us know what you think as more comes down the pipeline, and as ever – stay safe on the twisties. 

*Media sourced from our own channels, as well as Honda’s press release*