Custom Eye Candy: SMCO Tricks Out LiveWire One™ Into a Hooligan Racer

A view of the "Hooligan Racer" that the two brothers at SMCO put together for this year's first Autopia 2099

Brothers Aaron and Shaun Guardado started up SMCO (Suicide Machine Co.) in 2010, spending their days selling merch and building custom competition motorcycles in Long Beach “to back up the brand and feed their appetite for racing and performance.” 

It’s been eleven years, with most of the duo’s efforts realized in the form of Harley-Davidson flat trackers and performance bikes for hooligan racing – they “even converted a pair of Harley-Davidson® Street Rod® motorcycles into snow bikes for a winter hill climb at the ESPN X Games.”

“When we got our hands on the LiveWire One™, we immediately wanted to race it,” says Aaron Guardado in a press release from this year’s first Autopia 2099.

And, by all accounts, they did.  

A view of the three electric motorcycles held at Autopia 2099: SMCO's flat-tracker-inspired LiveWire Ones

The release states that the pair put two LiveWire One™ EV bikes in the Roland Sands Super Hooligan Championship at the Laguna Seca race course in California. 

There’s no note of their results, but one thing’s for sure – their project, christened the “Hooligan Racer” has made the LiveWire One™ that much more fun. 

“The bikes are so fast and so much fun to ride, but we wanted to find ways to improve on that performance,” said Aaron. 

A view of the "Hooligan Racer" that the two brothers at SMCO put together for this year's first Autopia 2099

“We started by reducing rotating mass with a set of carbon fiber wheels from BST. Then we removed all the stock bodywork and used it to make molds for our own lightweight carbon fiber body pieces.”

“We also designed our own rear-set foot controls to put us in a more-aggressive posture for road racing the bike.”

A view of the "Hooligan Racer" that the two brothers at SMCO put together for this year's first Autopia 2099

“This project really pushed us into some new technology,” finishes Aaron. 

“We learned to use CAD and a 3D printer to create the rear sets, for example.”

We’re told that the parts the pair used for the build did use the stock mounting points of the factory LiveWire One™ for this project, so if there’s enough interest it’s possible the shop could carry their bodywork as future accessible mods for the masses.

Let us know what you think by dropping a comment below – we love hearing from you.

In the meantime, check out other custom LiveWire One™ builds from our archives, and as always – stay safe on the twisties.

*All media courtesy of Autopia 2099’s official website, and LiveWire’s media release*