Custom Eye Candy: A Handbuilt 1910 Indian

“I Made All of the Parts Except for the Wheel and the Headlight”

A hand-built 1910 Indian from the shop of one Raymond Quayle. Media sourced from KALLTV.
A hand-built 1910 Indian from the shop of one Raymond Quayle. Media sourced from KALLTV.

Deep in the northern heart of Iowa sits a man who decided last year that he needed a challenge. 

The challenge in question? 

Why, building a replica 1910 Indian motorcycle, of course – and considering everything but the wheel and the headlight were made completely in-house, we’re thinking the bloke got what he came for. 

A hand-built 1910 Indian from the shop of one Raymond Quayle. Media sourced from KALLTV.
A hand-built 1910 Indian from the shop of one Raymond Quayle. Media sourced from KALLTV.

“I looked at everything as a challenge and how to get there,” Quayle says in coverage on KAALTV.

“At that time, Indian was the largest motorcycle manufacturer in the world. If I can inspire young people to try and be more creative and use their hands, and start to build things again, I think that’s what this world needs, we need to start building things again.”

A hand-built 1910 Indian from the shop of one Raymond Quayle. Media sourced from KALLTV.
A hand-built 1910 Indian from the shop of one Raymond Quayle. Media sourced from KALLTV.

The build started with inspiration, which came in the form of a restaurant brochure for the Anamosa National Motorcycle Museum.

Best part?

The final product – a commitment that took a year to complete – even fooled the curator of the museum when Quayle showed his new unit to them. 

A hand-built 1910 Indian from the shop of one Raymond Quayle. Media sourced from KALLTV.
A hand-built 1910 Indian from the shop of one Raymond Quayle. Media sourced from KALLTV.

“There’s a lot of people that do good work, and I appreciate the attention that [the project] has got,” admits Quayle. 

“Back when I was a kid, I couldn’t afford nothing, I had to build what I wanted.”

As for the ship-shape state of the peashooter, we’re told she’s rideable – a factor which contributed to her winning the people’s choice award, first in antiques, and second in best paint at the Abate National Motorcycle Show.

A hand-built 1910 Indian from the shop of one Raymond Quayle. Media sourced from KALLTV.
A hand-built 1910 Indian from the shop of one Raymond Quayle. Media sourced from KALLTV.

“I built it with the full intention of riding it,” Quayle finishes staunchly.

With a bevy of new shows lined up for the 1910 Indian, we wish Quayle the very best!
For other related news, be sure to check back here at wBW’s shiny new webpage; the newsletter will be condensing the best of the week’s latest, so subscribe when you have a chance and as ever – stay safe on the twisties. 

*Media sourced from KAALTV*