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Lock It or Lose It: Motorcycle Security Expert Talks Anti-Theft

“Insurance is Far From the Best Bet to Keep a Rider on the Road.”

A pile of motorcycle parts, symbolic of what typically happens to pinched bikes as robbers source bike guts for money. Media sourced from Family Instructor.
A pile of motorcycle parts, symbolic of what typically happens to pinched bikes as robbers source bike guts for money. Media sourced from Family Instructor.
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In today’s market, new motorcycles pose as much a pop of beauty as they do a potential target for burglaries; with the inflation of not-so-nice numbers on motorcycle theft, the bike market is more vulnerable than ever to quiet fingers looking for a scoot to steal. 

It’s such a problem, in fact, that the KOG Institute for Marketing and Communication Sciences brought out a new survey, asking 600 people about how they protect their bikes from theft. 

A rider securing a bike lock on the front wheel. Media sourced from RideApart.
A rider securing a bike lock on the front wheel. Media sourced from RideApart.

According to the relevant press release, “only half of owners took proactive steps to protect their motorcycle from theft…[and] the top two actions that respondents identified when asked how they protect their motorcycle were to have insurance and to remove the key from the ignition.”

Bruno Rimkunas, an employee of safety brand Monimoto and the head of business development/a motorcycle security expert, has a few tips on effective ways to keep your bike where you put it – and surprisingly, insurance isn’t top of the list. 

A. pair of idiots pinching a bike. Media sourced from Youtube.
A pair of idiots pinching a bike. Media sourced from Youtube.

“Insurance is far from the best bet to keep a rider on the road. Sure, it will help reimburse your loss, but, obviously, it won’t get your bike back or prevent it from being stolen,” Rimkunas explains.

“We all know that insurance can’t replace a vintage motorcycle or a one-of-a-kind custom bike. In many cases today, a local dealer doesn’t have replacement bikes in the showroom to get you back on the road…and there WILL be police reports, claim forms and sometimes a significant wait to recover from a motorcycle theft.”

So what does Rimkunas recommend, in addition to having your insurance up-to-date?

A bike featuring a MoniMoto GPS tracker. Media sourced from Monimoto's press release.
A bike featuring a MoniMoto GPS tracker. Media sourced from Monimoto’s press release.

Apparently, bike locks are a priority on the docket, with GPS trackers (such as Monimoto) being an increasingly critical addition, along with parking in a garage ‘whenever possible.’

Here’s the full list of tips to prevent motorcycle theft:

  • Park in a garage
  • Remove the key from ignition
  • Add a GPS tracker
  • Covering the bike
  • Marking the motorcycle parts
  • Make use of multiple locks (including steering locks/brake disc/grip units)

What are your thoughts?

Drop a comment below letting us know what you think, subscribe for our newsletter as other news comes down the proverbial pipeline, and as ever – stay safe on the twisties. 

*Media sourced from Youtube, RideApart and Family Instructor, as well as the relevant press release*

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    1. My Monimoto really works. You will be alerted as soon as the bike is moved. What you do after that is an issue.

  1. Cover the bike. Use at least two locking devices, both different. I use a Hiplock D1000 which is resistant to angle grinders. Seeing the photo of the scumbags using a dolly helps me realize locking BOTH wheels is a good idea. Not always possible to lock the bike TO something, but if I can I do.

    1. Hey Mark,

      Couldn’t agree more – I haven’t tried the Hiplock D1000 but I’ve heard good things about it.

      I myself just use a double chain & lock system for the garage – no need as of yet to stop by anywhere in the city, but time will tell.

      Thanks for stopping by,

      Amanda