Recall: Honda Africa Twins Pulled Due to DCT Software Error

Over 1560 Units from 2020/2021 Affected

Honda's iconic African Twin. Media sourced from AutoEvolution.
Honda's iconic African Twin. Media sourced from AutoEvolution.

The NHSTA has a new recall for the 2022 archives – and this time, it’s to do with Honda’s CRF1100 Africa Twin

According to an article from AutoEvolution, the recall stemmed from a report of an engine stalling in the Japanese motorcycle market. 

Honda's iconic African Twin. Media sourced from AutoEvolution.
Honda’s iconic African Twin. Media sourced from AutoEvolution.

With the trouble bike in question now repurchased by the European division in March of 2021 (and two more problem machines acquired from Italy and Germany), Honda set to work testing out the Twins to recreate the problem. 

Fast forward to this year, and Honda has determined (via AutoEvolution) that, “a defect related to motor vehicle safety existed.” 

“The programming issue produces abnormal data that resets the engine control unit, causing the controller area network (CAN) communication to disconnect and the clutch to be released on DCT-equipped models.”

Honda's iconic African Twin. Media sourced from AutoEvolution.
Honda’s iconic African Twin. Media sourced from AutoEvolution.

The report goes on to mention that no one has gotten hurt by the software error, with the following engine models affected by the recall: 

38770-MKS-A51

38770-MKS-AV1

38770-MKS-A52

38770-MKS-AV2

Honda's iconic African Twin. Media sourced from AutoEvolution.
Honda’s iconic African Twin. Media sourced from AutoEvolution.

Naturally, owners that have been affected by this recall will be contacted with instructions for their poor bikes; anybody that has a 2022 Africa Twin, fear not – the report also states that 2022 Twins have been remedied ‘with proper OBD data management for all 2022 model year Africa Twins for the North American market.’

Be sure to stay tuned via our newsletter, drop a comment below letting us know what you think, and as ever – stay safe on the twisties. 

*Media sourced from AutoEvolution*