Matt Chambers of Curtiss Says He Wants the Company’s Bikes to be Timeless


Curtis Motorcycles Zeus cafe racer

An Interesting Take From an Interesting Company

You’ve probably seen Curtiss Motorcycles’ machines at some point. The guys running Curtiss used to run Confederate Motorcycles and put out some seriously amazing V-twin machines. Confederate Motorcycles was sold to a new owner in 2018, and still produces amazing V-twin motorcycles. Curtiss Motorcycles has shifted its focus to electric bikes. 

I have to be honest. I’ve never really taken Curtiss that seriously. The company’s bikes look weird. I don’t find them particularly attractive, and I find their prices to be absolutely outrageous. With that said, they are unique motorcycles and a bike that someone could buy if they had a ton of money to burn and desperately wanted to stand out.

I really see them as art pieces more than usable motorcycles. I doubt many of them are ever ridden. Instead, I assume these sit around and act as expensive artwork for most of the buyers. Maybe I’m wrong.

Anyway, RideApart had the opportunity to chat with Matt Chambers, the company’s CEO, and one part of the conversation caught my eye. Champers said that he wants his bikes to be timeless machines and something that’s passed down. He also told the publication that Curtiss is working on new battery technology and upgrades for the bikes.

I think these motorcycles could definitely be something that people hang on to and pass down. They’re expensive and interesting. The current battery tech makes it hard to believe these bikes will be at all relevant in twenty years or so. Technology should far surpass where it sits today. Hopefully, Curtiss is able to provide the necessary upgrades for the bikes.

Curtiss has some new models coming. While these two-wheeled machines aren’t my cup of tea, I have to applaud the company for thinking outside the box.

1 Comment

  1. Avatar
    Alan Hassall
    January 17, 2020
    Reply

    The way things are going, I am not sure that one will be able to maintain many of the big name brands in even 10 years. They have so many unique parts and how long will the computers and sensors last? Car companies use much of the same parts throughout several generations of a model. I don’t believe that is true with motorcycles. When it comes to these boutique brands, which will be primitive in a few years, nothing will be available for them and there will never have been enough of them to be able to salvage parts off of damaged ones.

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