H2 Motronics: New Hydrogen Motorcycle Set For Spring 2022


A view of the hydrogen motorcycle from H2 Motronics

The motorcycle community, I would argue, is relatively small – not as small as it used to be, but it is still considered more intimate than the raging automotive industry that surrounds us today. Within that community is the tightly-knit fan group cheering for a two-wheeled electric future with cleaner energy sources – and within that group, there’s a few that have tackled the concept of using hydrogen as an energy source. (I’d argue that everyone in that particular huddle is on a first-name basis with each other.) 

Among these brilliant, alternative minds stands a company called H2 Motronics – and they’ve got a finalized hydrogen-powered prototype that’s a whopping 25% lighter than an electric alternative, fresh off the lab table. 

“The platform of a high-performance motorcycle powered by hydrogen fuel cell will encompass all the requirements of efficient mobility: compact, light, efficient and environmentally friendly,” states New.in-24.

A view of the hydrogen motorcycle from H2 Motronics

Emmanuel Esno is the Managing Director of the Nivernais Texys Group, and it’s subsidiary H2 Motronics – a company with a small team geared to create a performance machine capable of Moto 3-spec levels by stuffing all the following hydrogen propulsion elements in a motorcycle: a fuel cell, 23-liter tank, a compressor, a humidifier and measuring and control instruments, on top of the obligatory electric elements present in the screens of today’s Moto3 beasties.

In essence, the company is determined to create an efficient machine that runs on hydrogen. To do that, they know they must start with the hardest challenge yet; a hydrogen-powered machine that still uses electric power to run the traditional components (dash, lights, etc.)

The end result is crazy but apparently worked; specs of H2 Motronic’s prototype has the report tossing out things like how it can reach ‘the performance level of 3 motorcycles, shooting a 4-kilometer circuit in 98 seconds.’ (we are dubious of this, but remain optimistic…)

Designed by automobile designer Stéphane Valdant, the prototype is currently undergoing two test campaigns at the FC-Lab in Belfort. Should these prove successful, the report states that the beastie will then be ready for its debut in the spring of 2022.

We will keep you posted on what happens here; in the meantime, make sure to check out Honda’s current standing with their hydrogen concept – and as always, stay safe on the twisties.

 

7 Comments

  1. Darren-p
    October 22, 2021
    Reply

    I thought hydrogen engines create electricity, some of which can run the dash and lights etc

    • October 25, 2021
      Reply

      Hey Darren-P,

      Lovely hearing from you!

      Copying this for Mike, as the two of you make good points, and I’ll be answering the two of you within the next two minutes.

      I looked into this as I wanted to make absolutely sure I wasn’t scrambling anybody’s baskets. Here’s a quote from bikesales.com/au that seems to adequately explain the difference between electric bikes and hydrogen:

      “A fuel cell is like a battery that creates electricity through a mix of a fuel (hydrogen, in this case) and an oxidizing agent (usually oxygen). It requires a continuous supply of fuel and oxygen to sustain the chemical reaction needed for propulsion.”
      “Without getting too scientific, fuel cells use an external fuel (hydrogen) and oxygen, whereas batteries draw chemical energy from metals already contained within the battery.
      Where this favors fuel cells is that they will continue to produce electricity as long as fuel and oxygen are being supplied. Batteries, on the other hand, go through a charge and discharge cycle. A battery cannot charge while it is discharging – once the power is drained, the battery must be charged up again.”

      I also gave the original news source for this article another read. It seems that you are correct, the components typically electric on a fossil fuel bike (dash, lights, etc.) will remain traditionally wired and will feed into the rest of the bike, which will likely have a traditional battery to handle those components.
      Whether they have yet developed technology to allow that battery to remain charged by the hydrogen quality of the bike remains to be seen and will be interesting to see.
      I’ve told Mike that I will take a look for the two of you on any further news for this beastie and will update the article on what I find later this week.

      Thanks for the chats, and enjoy your week. 🙂

  2. Mike
    October 25, 2021
    Reply

    Darren-P is right. That’s what hydrogen fuel cells do. They create electricity. Perhaps the challenge is converting it to the voltage needed for the dash/lights/etc without using non-standard components?

    Also, with so much “exaggeration” in the electric and hydrogen world, a real-world picture of the prototype, or it doesn’t exist.

    • October 25, 2021
      Reply

      Hello Mike,

      Lovely hearing from you!

      Copying this for Darren, as the two of you make good points, and I’ll be answering the two of you within the next two minutes.

      I looked into this as I wanted to make absolutely sure I wasn’t scrambling anybody’s baskets. Here’s a quote from bikesales.com/au that seems to adequately explain the difference between electric bikes and hydrogen:

      “A fuel cell is like a battery that creates electricity through a mix of a fuel (hydrogen, in this case) and an oxidizing agent (usually oxygen). It requires a continuous supply of fuel and oxygen to sustain the chemical reaction needed for propulsion.”
      “Without getting too scientific, fuel cells use an external fuel (hydrogen) and oxygen, whereas batteries draw chemical energy from metals already contained within the battery.
      Where this favors fuel cells is that they will continue to produce electricity as long as fuel and oxygen are being supplied. Batteries, on the other hand, go through a charge and discharge cycle. A battery cannot charge while it is discharging – once the power is drained, the battery must be charged up again.”

      That being said, I gave the original news source for this article another read. It seems that you are correct, the components typically electric on a fossil fuel bike (dash, lights, etc.) will remain traditionally wired and will feed into the rest of the bike, which will likely have a traditional battery to handle the component side of things. Whether they have yet developed technology to allow that battery to remain charged by the hydrogen quality of the bike remains to be seen.

      As for the image of the bike…you’re right. They’ve not been very forthcoming about the real-world peek at their beastie. I will look into this, and if I find anything, consider the article updated. 🙂

  3. Darren-p
    October 25, 2021
    Reply

    I just assumed theyd incorporate a li battery under the seat

    • October 25, 2021
      Reply

      You’d think. It certainly seems that would be an easy enough choice for them.

      I’ve reached out to see what they have to say, standby 🙂

  4. October 26, 2021
    Reply

    A wonderful work of art. I dream of such a motorcycle! Maybe we will finally see a world without exhaust fumes produced from non-renewable energy sources. We focus on Eco

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