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BMW Scooter Oil and Filter Change

Changing the Oil and Filter on the BMW C 650 GT
by Rick K. for webBikeWorld.com

More: BMW C 650 GT Blog

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Background

I finally got around to changing the oil and filter on the C 650 GT and here's my report.

It's a relatively easy job, with no surprises.

It would be nice if BMW had a shop manual though; I don't know the torque values for the drain plugs.

That's right -- there are two drain plugs, which I'll describe (also see the photos below).

BMW is very specific about the oil type to be used in their scooters, and I described this in detail in my BMW Scooter Maintenance Schedule report.

So I ordered up a jug o' Repsol Moto Rider 4T 15W50, figuring I'll now also have part ownership in Marc Marquez and Dani Pedrosa's battle for the 2013 MotoGP championship in my own little way!

The Repsol stuff is both SJ and JASO MA rated, which is specified by BMW. I figure this is important, just in case something happens and I don't want BMW saying I didn't use the correct oil.

Besides, it's fairly cheap, all things considered, at 29 bucks and change for the 4-liter jug and -- guess what? That included free shipping! That in itself saves me a sawbuck in gas, wear 'n' tear and time, making the real price downright cheap.

Oil Reservoir Dipstick
The oil level dipstick is under the left rear floorboard on the BMW scooter.
See the BMW Scooter Maintenance Schedule for more photos and information.
Repsol Oil and Filter
Here's the Repsol Moto Rider 4T 15W50 oil and the BMW 11 42 7 673 541 oil filter for the scooter.
Engine Drain Plug
Front engine oil drain plug on the BMW scooter. Note location of oil filter, upper right (towards front wheel).
Draining the Oil

BMW (or anyone else) has yet to release a shop manual, so I'm flying blind here with the oil change. But there are apparently two drain plugs; one for the engine, just to the rear of the filter (photo above) and another drain plug under the oil reservoir on the left-hand side of the scooter.

The engine drain plug (standard 8 mm hex) uses a metal crush washer, available from the BMW dealer. I should have measured it, because there are probably substitutes, but didn't. Maybe next time...

I put the scooter on the Baxley Sport Chock (review) because it keeps the scooter closer to level than the center stand, but the center stand should work just fine. The drain plug is the standard 8 mm Allen head type, it's easy enough to remove and drain the oil into a low, flat pan.

Note that the front engine oil drain plug only drains about 1.5 liters of oil. The rest of the oil is in the reservoir on the left, under the reservoir, shown in the photo below. I'm not sure how the oil gets from one low point to another; let's just hope the oil pump doesn't fail!

Reservoir Drain Plug
Second drain plug under the oil reservoir on the left-hand side, above side stand.

The 17 mm drain plug cap under the reservoir feels like aluminum, so be extra careful with this one. It does not have a gasket or crush washer. I folded the side stand down and placed a piece of aluminum foil under the drain plug to keep the oil off of the parts and direct it into the drain pan. Here's a photo:

Reservoir Oil Drain
I used a piece of aluminum foil to direct the oil into the drain pan. Note screen filter.
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The remainder of the oil is drained from this reservoir. Also, this one has a tube screen filter. With your rubber gloves still on, remove the filter and clean it. By the way, the engine oil drain plug has a magnet and it had some metal particles on it. The tube filter also had some dirt in it. I blew some carb cleaner on it and sprayed it with some canned air to clean it up.

The tube has O-rings on either side; make sure you position the filter correctly when you replace it.

With no shop manual, I have no torque values, so I simply tightened both drain plugs using feel -- not too tight; not too loose. I think most people tend to over-tighten drain plugs anyway. Hopefully someone will have the torque values and I'll post them here?

The oil filter is easy to remove. I used a strap wrench to loosen it. I slowly filled the replacement with clean oil until it wouldn't accept any more; this helps maintain oil pressure on the first startup after the oil change. I put the standard light coat of clean oil on the rubber gasket and hand-tightened the filter on the engine after checking to make sure the seating was clean.

Screen Filter
The screen tube filter has O-rings on either end. Remove it and clean it before re-filling the oil.
BMW Scooter Oil Filter
Here's a close-up of the oil filter. I slowly fill it with clean oil before installation to ensure pressure on startup.
Oil Fill and Capacity

With everything buttoned up, it was time to fill 'er up. The Repsol 4-liter jug has a pull-out spout, but you'll still need a narrow funnel. I slowly poured in the oil and checked after about 2.5 liters, then slowly topped it up. When the oil level was about half-way between "Min" and "Max" on the dipstick, I replaced the dipstick and started the scooter.

There were no oil warning lights; always a good sign (and probably helped by pre-filling the filter). After about 30 seconds, I shut it off and let it sit for a while, then checked the oil level again and topped it off.

Surprisingly, it took exactly the 3.1 liters as stated in the owner's manual that is necessary after an oil and filter change. So I have 0.9 liters left in the Repsol jug for topping up later on, but so far this scooter doesn't use any oil between changes.

UPDATE: Torque Specifications

Here are the torque specs as identified by BMW:

Also, here is a copy of the .pdf with the oil and filter change instructions from the BMW service manual. You can buy your Repsol Moto Rider 4T 15W50 oil here, which meets the BMW specifications for the BMW scooters and motorcycles.

Conclusion

That's all there is to it; not much to report actually, it's a basic oil and filter change and -- besides the two drain plugs -- it's fairly straightforward. Anyone can do it. I just wish I knew the correct torque values for the drain plugs though...

More: BMW Scooter Maintenance Tips  |  BMW C 650 GT Blog

Publication Date: May 2013

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From "P.M." (May 2013): "BMW Scooter oil change was an excellent article. I also learnt about pre filling oil filter that I did not know plus the front wheel chock hyperlink took me to another area where I have no expertise. Thanks again."

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